Saturday, September 29, 2018

Detachable Phalli - and Memes!

Who would have thought detachable phalli were so popular!

In "Lovers Sans Phalli" (in Lovers in Hell), the Egyptian god of rejuvenation called Osiris searches for his, and enlists the tomb-raiding Howard Carter! Madness.

For teasers, I share the King Missile song of similar theme, and several memes.

Enjoy! 










Nov-Dec Group read Topic Vote

Monday, September 17, 2018

Hell Week - Lovers in Hell 2018



 Lovers In Hell


Lovers in Hell is unleashed!  Now comes HELL WEEK!


A previous post reviews the book.  This post covers another Hell Week celebrating it's release. Hell Week is seven days of interviews of authors and their characters (yes, their characters do the talking too). Here are the posts:


Are Genitalia Needed For Love? (asking for the god Osiris)

Here's a snippet of my post:

Howard Carter (raider of King Tut's tomb) is interrogated by the Library of Erana about the whereabouts of Osiris's sacred phallus:

[Interviewer]: “Howard, are you still practicing your thievery?”

[HC]: “Archaeology?”


[Interviewer]: “Semantics. Do you court danger by hoarding treasures of antiquity?”

[HC]: (Rubs the hidden item in his suit pocket, then winks at his partner Ernst Haeckel). “I do appreciate royal artefacts.”

[Interviewer]: “What is in your pocket, Mr. Carter?”

[EH]: (Glancing wide-eyed at Carter, gasps as he discerns the phallic shape tucked into the backside of Carter’s vest).

[HC]: (Shifts to conceal his chest from view). “Why? Are you in the market for something? I sense you would like to maintain anonymity like my other clients. I am open to offers.”

Sunday, September 16, 2018

The Elusive, Inspirational Soul – Once & Future Podcast - Guest Blog and Sponsoring



Dyscrasia Fiction is building connections with The Once and Future Podcast blog. Thanks Melanie Meadors and Anton Strout for the opportunity to sponsor and episode and to guest blog.


Guest Blog: The Elusive, Inspirational Soul (link)

For most artists, including writers, the act of creating attempts to capture and share some emotion, or conversely, evoke an emotional response from an audience. Often, we draw inspiration from our past experiences, traumatic or enjoyable, to deepen the impact. As a scientist, I find the entire transaction of emotions oddly inspirational and terrifying. Feelings are ubiquitous, but cannot be measured objectively; they do not seem to adhere to any law of conservation like energy or mass obey (is there any limit to sorrow or joy?).



The Once & Future Podcast is a weekly book-centric podcast for readers and writers alike that focuses on all things fantasy and science fiction, talking with today's hottest authors about their books, writing, and general geekery. 

"This episode we talk with author Signe Pike about The Lost Queen, the beginning of her new trilogy that features Languoreth—a forgotten queen of sixth-century Scotland—and twin sister of the man who inspired the legend of Merlin. We also discuss her previous book Fairie Tale: One Woman’s Search for Enchantment In A Modern World.  But that’s not all!  We also cover being an ex-Penguin, her former life as an acquisitions editor, writing, our love of folklore and mythology, and the power of panic writing!"










Saturday, September 15, 2018

Is this Doctor Grave? Orphan Maker?

Orphan Maker
Antonio J. Manzanedo’s Infernal Executioner

Planning the next two installments of Dyscrasia Fiction.

Working Title of one: Orphan Maker


Initial Blurb: The mischievous necromancer Doctor Grave has a Rule: “To raise one family, you must sacrifice another.” The golem strives to be a family man with his three arisen daughters, but the independence he espouses may backfire.


Context: Orphan Maker has many dual meanings in a world full of broken families, but it is also the name of an magical ax (akin to Ferrus Eviscamir and Ferrus Hewnmaw).

Chronology: This picks up right after Spawn of Dyscrasia's epilogue, in which Dr. Grave raises three daughters from clay.

Cover Art: TBD. If I can save funds, I would love to strike a commission with Daniel Landerman again (he illustrated Helen's Daimones).

For inspiration, I have been awing over Antonio J. Manzanedo’s Infernal Executioner. I connected with Antonio J. Manzando and am able to license it.

  • The Ax is very similar to my depiction of Orphan Maker.
  • The "Executioner"'s white skin and scar on chest actually match Doctor Grave's  clay/earthy sin but he is usually depicted with an apron (of flayed faces).
  • But is this Grave?

Do readers agree that this represent Doctor Grave?
Cover art ideas?
I post my own illustrations of Doctor Grave that appear in Lords of Dyscrasia:









Friday, September 14, 2018

Weapon of Flesh - Review by SE

Weapon of Flesh by Chris A. Jackson
SE rating: 5 of 5 stars

Weapon of Flesh: Accessible, Well-designed Dark Fantasy: The back-cover blurb is concise and has no spoilers, and captures the book well (copied/pasted below).

This book is saturated with oppression, violence, and murder but none of that is gratuitous. Like his assassin characters, author Chris A. Jackson balances several tight-rope acts: (a) have the protagonist, Lad, commit evil acts while being innocent at heart; (b) present the coming of age of three characters with burgeoning romance without being cheesy; (c) dole out humor (mostly through Lad's dialogue) while shedding blood; (d) present mature themes of identity and life-purpose with an easy-to-read style (suitable for YA or adult audiences).

Each chapter blends into the next with a carefully scripted, enjoyable plot with just the right amount of tension. All the main characters (Lad, Mya, Wiggin) grow while establishing strong character motivations. There are five more in the series and this is solid introduction. Before I jump into #2 Weapon of Blood, I will read Chris A. Jackson's Deathmask since I already have the paperback and  I'm a sucker for necromancers.

Most (if not all) are illustrated by Noah Stacey:
Weapon of Flesh (Weapon of Flesh, #1) by Chris A. Jackson Weapon of Blood (Weapon of Flesh, #2) by Chris A. Jackson Weapon of Vengeance (Weapon of Flesh, #3) by Chris A. Jackson Weapon of Fear (Weapon of Flesh, #4) by Chris A. Jackson Weapon of Pain (Weapon of Flesh, #5) by Chris A. Jackson Weapon of Mercy (Weapon of Flesh, #6) by Chris A. Jackson

Weapon of Flesh Series
#1 Weapon of Flesh 2005
#2 Weapon of Blood 2013
#3 Weapon of Vengeance 2014
#4 Weapon of Fear 2015 *
#5 Weapon of Pain 2016 *
#6 Weapon of Mercy 2017 *
(* with Anne L. McMillen-Jackson)

Back Cover Blurb to Weapon of Flesh:
"Forged from flesh… and magic. Made to kill… but not to feel.

He was made for one purpose: To be the most efficient killer, the most lethal assassin the world had ever seen. But something has gone wrong with the plan.

The Master is gone… The weapon is free… And in a dangerous world, a weapon does what a weapon is made to do. Or does he?

Without even a name, the weapon chooses one: Lad. And so the weapon begins to become a person… All he has been told is that his destiny awaits him, so he seeks it out, though he knows not what that destiny is.

But the one who paid for the weapon to be forged awaits his prize…impatiently. The Grandfather of Assassins has invested nearly two decades and a fortune in his perfect weapon, and when it does not arrive on time, he begins to search. His hunters are seeking Lad, and Lad is seeking his destiny.

There is only one problem: No one thought a weapon of flesh would fall in love."



View all my reviews

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Lover in Hell - "Lovers Sans Phalli"

Cover art by Roy Mauritsen 


Download it or the free sampler today! Hell never disappoints. 

Are genitalia needed for love? To feel "whole"? Without them, you may be in Hell.

Egyptian myths really handicapped Osiris, god of rejuvenation--even left him penis-less for a time. Eh gad. His wife Isis repaired him by most accounts, but in this version of afterlife fate may differ. 
My contribution to this anthology is “Lovers Sans Phalli.”  To repair the penis-less Osiris of Duat, a dozen cursed pharaohs team with the infamous, tomb-raiding Howard Carter (of King Tut's tomb) and discredited evolutionist Ernst Haeckel. 
The Heroes in Hell books all stand alone, but also have story arcs spanning across books. My story continues a story arc beginning with "Curse of the Pharaohs" in Pirates in Hell. This volume is all about Lovers, and Love, in Hell:

SYNOPSIS:
Shakespeare said "To be wise and love exceeds man's might," and in Lovers in Hell, the damned in hell exceed all bounds as they search for their true loves, punish the perfidious, and avoid getting caught up in Satan's snares. In ten stories of misery and madness, hell's most loveless seek to slake the thirst that can never be quenched, and find true love amid the lies of ages.

Only fools fall in love, and hell is filled with fools. Our damned lovers include: Christopher Marlowe and Will Shakespeare, Napoleon and Wellington, Orpheus and Eurydice, Hatshepsut and Senenmut, Abelard and Heloise, Helen and Penelope, Saint Teresa and Satan's Reaper, Madge Kendall and the Elephant Man, and more . . . -- all of whom pay a hellish price for indulging their affections.

Now available as a Kindle, and coming soon in deluxe trade paper. Whether you're lovelorn or love-sworn, the rages and ravages of love await . . .

CONTENTS

  • Cover Art by : Roy Mauritsen 
  • Janet Morris & Chris Morris: "Love in the Afterlife", Parts 1, 2, and 3 ("Never Doubt I Love"; "Fume of Sighs"; "Wrath of Love") 
  • Nancy Asire: "Love Interrupted"
  • S. E. Lindberg: "Lovers Sans Phalli" 
  • Michael E. Dellert: "Calamity" 
  • Michael H. Hanson: "Love Triangle" 
  • A. L. Butcher: "A Hand of Four Queens" 
  • Andrew P. Weston: "Devil’s Trull"
  • Joe Bonadonna: "Withering Blights" 
  • Andrew P. Weston: excerpt from Hell Gate